Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea

Updated on Friday

This summer, experience “Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea,” which is a larger-than-life exhibit of 17 marine wildlife sculptures—from jellyfish to sharks—made entirely of plastic pollution directly recovered from oceans.

Placed throughout the Smithsonian’s National Zoo, these massive sculptures represent the more than 315 billion pounds of plastic in oceans, illustrating the devastating effects of the ocean’s deadliest predator—trash.

The exhibition is created by The Washed Ashore Project, a non-profit, community-based organization with a mission of educating and creating awareness about plastic pollution through art. Washed Ashore is a free art exhibition running every day from May 27 to September 5 during regular Zoo hours. The exhibition features 17 sculptures made completely of marine debris. These sculptures are placed throughout the Zoo primarily located on Olmsted Walk.

The Smithsonian’s National Zoo & Conservation Biology Institute is committed to saving marine species and is a pioneer in coral research and conservation.

Learn more about the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute’s dedication to coral reef conservation, and marine animal conservation success stories, including sea lions and brown pelicans on view at the Zoo’s American Trail exhibit.

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Photography by Yin Tsai

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